Showing posts with label Papacy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Papacy. Show all posts

Monday, April 17, 2017

St. Francis of Assisi Prophecy of the Papacy

The Novus Ordo Watch published details of a prophecy from St Francis of Assisi

“A Man, not Canonically Elected, will be raised to the Pontificate… In those days Jesus Christ will send them not a true Pastor, but a Destroyer”

The book that contains this prophecy is available for free PDF download at Google Books. Click here to download it. If you would like to purchase a paperback copy, click here.

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

Litany of the Saints From John Paul II's Funeral

Litany of the Saints From John Paul II's Funeral

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Joseph Ratzinger Elected New Pope 2

After the death of Pope John Paul II in April 2005 cardinals decide that Joseph Ratzinger is to be elected Pope Benedict XVI. Smoke signals are seen coming from a chimney then he appears at the balcony of St. Peters Square at the Vatican.

Sunday, April 11, 2010

Pope John Paul II Dies

On 2nd April 2005 Pope John Paul II died after a prolonged struggle with ill health. Thousands of pilgrims queued for the chance to see him lying for public viewing at Saint Peter's Basilica at the Vatican in Rome, Italy.

Friday, April 2, 2010

Pope Benedict XVI: Christians “conquer” not through sword, but through the Cross

Vatican City, Apr 1, 2010 / 10:06 am (CNA/EWTN News).

Presiding this morning in Rome the Mass of Chrism, Pope Benedict XVI reminded that Christians, like Christ, do not “conquer” through the sword, but through the Cross.

The full text of his homily follows:

At the center of the Church’s worship is the notion of "sacrament". This means that it is not primarily we who act, but God comes first to meet us through his action, he looks upon us and he leads us to himself. Another striking feature is this: God touches us through material things, through gifts of creation that he takes up into his service, making them instruments of the encounter between us and himself. There are four elements in creation on which the world of sacraments is built: water, bread, wine and olive oil. Water, as the basic element and fundamental condition of all life, is the essential sign of the act in which, through baptism, we become Christians and are born to new life. While water is the vital element everywhere, and thus represents the shared access of all people to rebirth as Christians, the other three elements belong to the culture of the Mediterranean region. In other words, they point towards the concrete historical environment in which Christianity emerged. God acted in a clearly defined place on the earth, he truly made history with men. On the one hand, these three elements are gifts of creation, and on the other, they also indicate the locality of the history of God with us. They are a synthesis between creation and history: gifts of God that always connect us to those parts of the world where God chose to act with us in historical time, where he chose to become one of us.

Within these three elements there is a further gradation. Bread has to do with everyday life. It is the fundamental gift of life day by day. Wine has to do with feasting, with the fine things of creation, in which, at the same time, the joy of the redeemed finds particular expression. Olive oil has a wide range of meaning. It is nourishment, it is medicine, it gives beauty, it prepares us for battle and it gives strength. Kings and priests are anointed with oil, which is thus a sign of dignity and responsibility, and likewise of the strength that comes from God. Even the name that we bear as "Christians" contains the mystery of the oil. The word "Christians", in fact, by which Christ’s disciples were known in the earliest days of Gentile Christianity, is derived from the word "Christ" (Acts 11:20-21) – the Greek translation of the word "Messiah", which means "anointed one". To be a Christian is to come from Christ, to belong to Christ, to the anointed one of God, to whom God granted kingship and priesthood. It means belonging to him whom God himself anointed – not with material oil, but with the One whom the oil represents: with his Holy Spirit. Olive oil is thus in a very particular way a symbol of the total compenetration of the man Jesus by the Holy Spirit.

In the Chrism Mass on Holy Thursday, the holy oils are at the centre of the liturgical action. They are consecrated in the bishop’s cathedral for the whole year. They thus serve also as an expression of the Church’s unity, guaranteed by the episcopate, and they point to Christ, the true "shepherd and guardian" of our souls, as Saint Peter calls him (1 Pet 2:25). At the same time, they hold together the entire liturgical year, anchored in the mystery of Holy Thursday. Finally, they point to the Garden of Olives, the scene of Jesus’ inner acceptance of his Passion. Yet the Garden of Olives is also the place from which he ascended to the Father, and is therefore the place of redemption: God did not leave Jesus in death. Jesus lives for ever with the Father, and is therefore omnipresent, with us always. This double mystery of the Mount of Olives is also always "at work" within the Church’s sacramental oil. In four sacraments, oil is the sign of God’s goodness reaching out to touch us: in baptism, in confirmation as the sacrament of the Holy Spirit, in the different grades of the sacrament of holy orders and finally in the anointing of the sick, in which oil is offered to us, so to speak, as God’s medicine – as the medicine which now assures us of his goodness, offering us strength and consolation, yet at the same time points beyond the moment of the illness towards the definitive healing, the resurrection (cf. Jas 5:14). Thus oil, in its different forms, accompanies us throughout our lives: beginning with the catechumenate and baptism, and continuing right up to the moment when we prepare to meet God, our Judge and Saviour. Moreover, the Chrism Mass, in which the sacramental sign of oil is presented to us as part of the language of God’s creation, speaks in particular to us who are priests: it speaks of Christ, whom God anointed King and Priest – of him who makes us sharers in his priesthood, in his "anointing", through our own priestly ordination.

I should like, then, to attempt a brief interpretation of the mystery of this holy sign in its essential reference to the priestly vocation. In popular etymologies a connection was made, even in ancient times, between the Greek word "elaion" – oil – and the word "eleos" – mercy. In fact, in the various sacraments, consecrated oil is always a sign of God’s mercy. So the meaning of priestly anointing always includes the mission to bring God’s mercy to those we serve. In the lamp of our lives, the oil of mercy should never run dry. Let us always obtain it from the Lord in good time – in our encounter with his word, in our reception of the sacraments, in the time we spend with him in prayer.

As a consequence of the story of the dove bearing an olive branch to signal the end of the flood – and thus God’s new peace with the world of men – not only the dove but also the olive branch and oil itself have become symbols of peace. The Christians of antiquity loved to decorate the tombs of their dead with the crown of victory and the olive branch, symbol of peace. They knew that Christ conquered death and that their dead were resting in the peace of Christ. They knew that they themselves were awaited by Christ, that he had promised them the peace which the world cannot give. They remembered that the first words of the Risen Lord to his disciples were: "Peace be with you!" (Jn 20:19). He himself, so to speak, bears the olive branch, he introduces his peace into the world. He announces God’s saving goodness. He is our peace. Christians should therefore be people of peace, people who recognize and live the mystery of the Cross as a mystery of reconciliation. Christ does not conquer through the sword, but through the Cross. He wins by conquering hatred. He wins through the force of his greater love. The Cross of Christ expresses his "no" to violence. And in this way, it is God’s victory sign, which announces Jesus’ new way. The one who suffered was stronger than the ones who exercised power. In his self-giving on the Cross, Christ conquered violence. As priests we are called, in fellowship with Jesus Christ, to be men of peace, we are called to oppose violence and to trust in the greater power of love.

A further aspect of the symbolism of oil is that it strengthens for battle. This does not contradict the theme of peace, but forms part of it. The battle of Christians consisted – and still consists – not in the use of violence, but in the fact that they were – and are – ready to suffer for the good, for God. It consists in the fact that Christians, as good citizens, keep the law and do what is just and good. It consists in the fact that they do not do whatever within the legal system in force is not just but unjust. The battle of the martyrs consists in their concrete "no" to injustice: by taking no part in idolatry, in Emperor worship, they refused to bow down before falsehood, before the adoration of human persons and their power. With their "no" to falsehood and all its consequences, they upheld the power of right and truth. Thus they served true peace. Today too it is important for Christians to follow what is right, which is the foundation of peace. Today too it is important for Christians not to accept a wrong that is enshrined in law – for example the killing of innocent unborn children. In this way we serve peace, in this way we find ourselves following in the footsteps of Jesus Christ, of whom Saint Peter says: "When he was reviled he did not revile in return; when he suffered, he did not threaten; but he trusted to him who judges justly. He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, that we might die to sin and live to righteousness" (1 Pet 2:23f.).

The Fathers of the Church were fascinated by a phrase from Psalm 45 (44) – traditionally held to be Solomon’s wedding psalm – which was reinterpreted by Christians as the psalm for the marriage of the new Solomon, Jesus Christ, to his Church. To the King, Christ, it is said: "Your love is for justice; your hatred for evil. Therefore God, your God, has anointed you with the oil of gladness above other kings" (v. 8). What is this oil of gladness with which the true king, Christ, was anointed? The Fathers had no doubt in this regard: the oil of gladness is the Holy Spirit himself, who was poured out upon Jesus Christ. The Holy Spirit is the gladness that comes from God. From Jesus this gladness sweeps over us in his Gospel, in the joyful message that God knows us, that he is good and that his goodness is the power above all powers; that we are wanted and loved by him. Gladness is the fruit of love. The oil of gladness, which was poured out over Christ and comes to us from him, is the Holy Spirit, the gift of Love who makes us glad to be alive. Since we know Christ, and since in him we know God, we know that it is good to be a human being. It is good to be alive, because we are loved, because truth itself is good.

In the early Church, the consecrated oil was considered a special sign of the presence of the Holy Spirit, who communicates himself to us as a gift from Christ. He is the oil of gladness. This gladness is different from entertainment and from the outward happiness that modern society seeks for itself. Entertainment, in its proper place, is certainly good and enjoyable. It is good to be able to laugh. But entertainment is not everything. It is only a small part of our lives, and when it tries to be the whole, it becomes a mask behind which despair lurks, or at least doubt over whether life is really good, or whether non-existence might perhaps be better than existence. The gladness that comes to us from Christ is different. It does indeed make us happy, but it can also perfectly well coexist with suffering. It gives us the capacity to suffer and, in suffering, to remain nevertheless profoundly glad. It gives us the capacity to share the suffering of others and thus by placing ourselves at one another’s disposal, to express tangibly the light and the goodness of God. I am always struck by the passage in the Acts of the Apostles which recounts that after the Apostles had been whipped by order of the Sanhedrin, they "rejoiced that they were counted worthy to suffer dishonour for the name of Jesus" (Acts 5:41). Anyone who loves is ready to suffer for the beloved and for the sake of his love, and in this way he experiences a deeper joy. The joy of the martyrs was stronger than the torments inflicted on them. This joy was ultimately victorious and opened the gates of history for Christ. As priests, we are – in Saint Paul’s words – "co-workers with you for your joy" (2 Cor 1:24). In the fruit of the olive-tree, in the consecrated oil, we are touched by the goodness of the Creator, the love of the Redeemer. Let us pray that his gladness may pervade us ever more deeply and that we may be capable of bringing it anew to a world in such urgent need of the joy that has its source in truth. Amen.
Source: Catholic News Agency

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Why the Pope chose the name Benedict

April 2010 01:40 GMT-05:00

General Audience: Pope tells why he Chose Name of Benedict
In his first general audience, which was held this morning in St. Peter's Square in the presence of 15,000 people, the Pope again gave thanks to God for having elected him as Peter's successor, and explained why he chose the name of Benedict.

The Holy Father spoke of the feelings he was experiencing at the beginning of his ministry: "awe and gratitude to God, Who surprised me more than anyone in calling me to succeed the Apostle Peter; and interior trepidation before the greatness of the task and the responsibilities which have been entrusted to me. However, I draw serenity and joy from the certainty of God's help, that of His most Holy Mother the Virgin Mary, and of the patron saints. I also feel supported by the spiritual closeness of all the people of God whom, as I repeated last Sunday, I continue to ask to accompany me with persistent prayer."

"Resuming the Wednesday general audiences," he went on, "I wish to speak of the name I chose on becoming bishop of Rome and pastor of the universal Church. I chose to call myself Benedict XVI ideally as a link to the venerated Pontiff, Benedict XV, who guided the Church through the turbulent times of the First World War. He was a true and courageous prophet of peace who struggled strenuously and bravely, first to avoid the drama of war and then to limit its terrible consequences. In his footsteps I place my ministry, in the service of reconciliation and harmony between peoples, profoundly convinced that the great good of peace is above all a gift of God, a fragile and precious gift to be invoked, safeguarded and constructed, day after day and with everyone's contribution.

"The name Benedict also evokes the extraordinary figure of the great 'patriarch of western monasticism,' St. Benedict of Norcia, co-patron of Europe with Cyril and Methodius. The progressive expansion of the Benedictine Order which he founded exercised an enormous influence on the spread of Christianity throughout the European continent. For this reason, St. Benedict is much venerated in Germany, and especially in Bavaria, my own land of origin; he constitutes a fundamental point of reference for the unity of Europe and a powerful call to the irrefutable Christian roots of European culture and civilization."

The Pope appealed to St. Benedict for help "to hold firm Christ's central position in our lives. May he always be first in our thoughts and in all our activities!"

Before concluding, Benedict XVI announced that, just as at the beginning of his pontificate John Paul II had continued the reflections on Christian virtues begun by Pope John Paul I, in coming weekly audiences he would resume "the comments prepared by John Paul II on the second part of the Psalms and Canticles, which are part of Vespers. From next Wednesday, I will begin precisely from where his catechesis was interrupted after the general audience of January 26."

The Holy Father read out brief summaries of his catechesis, which he had delivered in Italian, in various other languages: English, French, Spanish and German. He then gave brief greetings to various groups in Croatian, Slovenian and Polish and concluded by addressing the 1,000 faithful from the archdiocese of Spoleto-Norcia, Italy, who were accompanied by Archbishop Riccardo Fontana.
Catholic News Agency

Tuesday, March 9, 2010

Pope Paul VI Gives His Blessing to Garabandal


This isn't an official approval from the Catholic Church, but it's probably the closest we have to it so far.

From: http://www.garabandal.org/News/Pope_Paul_Blessing.shtml

POPE PAUL VI GIVES HIS BLESSING to Maria C. Saraco, Director of St. Michael's Garabandal Center for Our Lady of Carrnel. In his public address May 19, 1971, he said:
"We ask the Lord to sustain you, and through your apostolate of prayer, to grant increased holiness in the Church and especially in the hearts of priests." Mrs. Saraco in presenting to the Holy Father a Rosary, carefully explained that it was made from the PINE BRANCHES of the PINE TREES Our Lady Stood in at GARABANDAL. Attached to the Rosary was an object kissed by the Blessed Virgin during her numerous appearances there. The Holy Father, after accepting the Rosary, took Mrs. Saraco's hands in His, with great affection, saying: "Thank you, thank you very much." At the May audience, the Pope explicitly approved the custom of prayers for priests. The Vatican has made no explicit ruling on the reported apparitions as yet, and will not until the prophesized events take place.

Monday, March 8, 2010

Our Holy Father Pope John II exclaimed "Garabandal!"

From http://www.garabandal.org/News/Pope_John_Paul.shtml

On June 21, 1987, Robert Francis Graves III, was ordained a Roman Catholic Priest at St. Peter's Basilica, by Our Holy Father, Pope John Paul II. Fr. Robert's parents were already deceased at the time of his ordination. However, none of his relatives and friends were present, nor did any of them acknowledge his new-found vocation because of his renunciation of fame and wealth in order to follow the call of Christ into the Catholic priesthood.

What Father Robert says is, "In the end Christ conquered. One cannot say 'No' to Love that calls at all times and in all seasons." He is a member of the community of "The Sons of The Divine Will."

On July 23, 1988, during a special general audience with the Pope at the Vatican ... "special" because it was held on Saturday, rather than the usual Wednesday... Father Robert introduced Garabandal Visionary Mari-Loli and family to him. Father Robert who was holding 7 year old Maria Dolores, one of the three Lafleur children, said to the Pope: "Your Holiness, a special blessing for your littlest children who come on behalf of The Blessed Virgin from Garabandal." Our Holy Father exclaimed "Garabandal!". . . And immediately kissed Maria Dolores.

The Pope then blessed Francis her 13 year old brother when he took him by the arm and asked for prayers.

Next the Pope with arms out stretched reached for and kissed their 8 year old sister, Melanie Maria Theresa who was enthralled with the pope and felt right at home with him.

Loli, who before meeting the Pope, viewed the prearranged occasion rather apprehensively. She was concerned about the impact it could possibly have because of her role as one of the world-famous Garabandal visionaries. However, after a visit with Bishop Gallo, the present bishop of the diocese of Santander, Spain, where the apparitions took place and receiving his encouragement, and with prayerful reflection, she resigned herself to the opportunity and accepted it as "God's Will." She simply asked the pope for his blessing and prayers for her family and for herself. The Holy Father placed his hands on her head, and gave his blessing.

Husband Frank, kissed the Holy Father's ring in acknowledgement to his supreme authority in representing Jesus Christ here on earth.

Finally, the Pope extended his arms wide as to embrace Loli and the entire family. Maria Saraco who was also present witnessed the entire episode.

Saturday, January 23, 2010

Pope John Paul II views of the Theology of the Body

Back when I was involved in my local Catholic church group about ten years ago this was one of the more popular books among our members who were study group about the Theology of the Body. A group leader recommended that we read "Love and Responsibility" by Pope John Paul II. The book is fascinating in that we can see the beginnings of his theology being developed. People often look at the Catholic church as being "against sex" and saying that Catholics think sex is dirty, etc. Obviously, this could not be farther from the truth, but John Paul shows us how God's plan for our salvation is tied into God's plan for our human relationships.

Part 23 of 37 - Call of Peter

This is the twenty-third part of a film on John Paul II and the Prophecies of Garabandal

Friday, January 22, 2010

Part 22 of 37 - Vatican II

This is the twenty-second part of a film on John Paul II and the Prophecies of Garabandal

Friday, January 8, 2010

Thursday, January 7, 2010

Monday, January 4, 2010

Part 04 of 37 - Miraculous Medal

This is the fourth part of a film on John Paul II and the Prophecies of Garabandal
with a focus on the Miraculous Medal.

Saturday, January 2, 2010

Friday, January 1, 2010

Part 01 of 37 - Introduction

This is the first part of a film on John Paul II and the Prophecies of Garabandal